0

So i have this

As Fate's worry grew and grew something drew her attention to a moving star in the sky. it's light got bigger and appeared to be falling to her

"Feeeeeeeeiiiiiiiiitoooooooooooooo-chan"

Nanoha flew right into Fate swinging around with her arms around Fate's neck unable to keep the excitement in seeing her girlfriend in any longer.

what's happening is that Nanoha is flying towards Fate. if i was using different font sizes when when she is calling out Fate's name (in this case is her petname Feito-chan) the first part of the line would be very small and barley legible but the font size will increase to the point that -chan would be normal size which is when Nanoha's flown into Fate.

Visually (as in if it was animated) the viewer would be hearing Nanoha's voice in the distance but only seeing Fate until Nanoha flys past the screen taking Fate with her and -chan would be brief because Nanoha would only be on screen for a mere moment before the view will have to change to Nanoha's and Fate's new position.

Since i am typing this up in Notepad++ i'm trying to avoid using any fonts but i also want to keep the illusion that Nanoha is off at a distance calling out to Fate as she flys in. how can i achive this without using different font sizes?

  • To clarify, are you looking for a way to achieve this by visually changing the speech without using fonts, or for a way to describe what is happening in the narrative? – Mac Cooper Mar 28 '16 at 11:37
  • 1
    @MacCooper describing what is happening in the narrative, i figured just altering the speech line wont be enough – Memor-X Mar 28 '16 at 11:41
1

In general, the author doesn't specify type sizes. That's something you'd have to negotiate with your publisher, but it can come across as gimmicky.

In your case, I'd recommend simply deleting the long spoken noise. It doesn't help us understand what's going on here. Just write the action.

(Also, *its.)

1

I'd simply say, "Her voice started out very faint but grew louder as she approached." I'd avoid trying to convey the idea with font changes or other typographical gimmicks. (a) If you eventually get this published, the publisher may not be prepared or willing to do that. And (b) Unless you explain it, the reader may not understand what you are trying to convey. And of course explaining it would break up the narrative.

  • I concur with Jay. I would describe it in more or less the same way. It might seem like it would draw the scene out, but it really doesn't to the reader (unless they read really slow). If you want to convey something, just describe it. – Thomas Reinstate Monica Myron Mar 29 '16 at 19:43
0

"As Fate's worry grew and grew something drew her attention to a moving star in the sky. The sky brightened as the light got closer and a voice yelled out in the distance from the star,

"Feeeeeeeeiiiiiiiiitoooooooooooooo-chan"

Nanoha flew right into Fate swinging around with her arms around Fate's neck unable to keep the excitement in seeing her girlfriend in any longer."

Personally, this is how I would word it. It's alright to have the movement described literally. The only time you would really change font in place of description would be in a graphic novel. I am not sure if this is helpful at all, but here is my best suggestion.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.