-1

I am currently writing a cover letter (for a job application) and after a long 'struggle' with the opening paragraph, I've decided to start it by briefly presenting myself and then continuing with

"The reason for which I am writing /to you ???/ is to express my interest in..."

I've already gone through so many other variants that I'm no more able to assess the suitablity/acceptablity of a given phrase, thus I will be very thankful if someone shares their opinion of the above one?

As a supplementary inquiry, I'd also like to ask about the expression "writing to you". I wonder - is it actually neccesary to add "... to you" or that's self-explanatory?

closed as off-topic by user5645, Neil Fein Jul 25 '15 at 21:29

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because asking what to write or asking for help rephrasing a sentence or passage are both off-topic here, as such questions are very unlikely to help anybody else." – Community, Neil Fein
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Have placed this on hold for now, since it's off-topic as per the reasons above. Please feel free to edit and we'll consider reopening; for more about how this site works, you can view our site tour. – Neil Fein Jul 25 '15 at 21:30
2

In business communication, as in most other communication, you want to be as concise as possible while still being effective.

Your sentence "The reason for which I am writing..." with or without the "to you" is unnecessarily convoluted.

Try "I am writing to express my interest..."

or even "I am interested in..."

Get to the point. I read a lot of cover letters at work, and I'm not looking for high word count, I'm looking for basic information.

  • Thank you for the reply. May I ask, though, isn't it a little irritating when every sentence starts with "I ..."? – newbie Jul 25 '15 at 20:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.