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I'm not very sure if it's called "main noun" (sorry, I didn't pay attention in my grammar class). But anyway, here's an example:

I decided to start my search at the library. Why? Well, it had more reliable information than the Internet -- than a bunch of blogs, tabloids, and news sites.

The library, that's where I decided to start my search. Why? Well, it had more reliable information than the Internet -- than a bunch of blogs, tabloids, and news sites.

The bolded part is what I call the "main noun" (the main focus of the sentence).

How do you decide its position?

How does the meaning differ in my two examples?

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English word order can vary (up to a point) and you create emphasis by where you place words. Usually something is seen as more important if it occurs first. For example, placing 'the library' first in the sentence you are giving it prominence. If you started with 'my search' that would be the most salient object.

  • Mmm, I'm confused. I read somewhere that the last part of sentence was the most important one. – Alexandro Chen Jul 16 '15 at 17:13
  • @AlexandroChen That's only true in certain languages — Russian, for one. In English, the most important part of the sentence can be anywhere. – Lauren-Clear-Monica-Ipsum Jul 16 '15 at 18:53

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