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I wish to use a phrase/word after a quote, to indicate that it was me who came up with it (i.e. a phrase to quote myself) This is for a blog post. Is there any way to do so without telling ' "......" - Yours Truly ' ?

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    Me, myself, and I :0 – ScotM Mar 9 '15 at 2:27
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If it is for a blog post you may like these exotic suggestions:

"There's little one can say, when what is to be said has already been said. The fact remains, that what more can be said, should be said, for that is what can make others say more about what has not been said ," quotably yours,

Or

My quote "there's little one can say, when what is to be said has already been said. The fact remains, that what more can be said, should be said, for that is what can make others say more about what has not been said ," is yours,

Or

"There's little one can say, when what is to be said has already been said. The fact remains, that what more can be said, should be said, for that is what can make others say more about what has not been said ," my quote; yours,

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  • I will use 'quotably yours' in the future. Thank you for the nice suggestion, (albeit uncommon) :) – Kugelblitz Mar 9 '15 at 8:52
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Use your own name, as if it were somebody else. Anything else will be too overly informal or else too pretentious.

An alternative, if you think it needs more emphasis (or if you think that citing yourself as if a third party is itself too pretentious), would be to write a one or two sentence introduction to the quote and then leave it either unattributed or attributed to yourself in the third person as I've already suggested.

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  • Alright @AdamKatz – Kugelblitz Mar 9 '15 at 4:55

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