2

Let's say I have two facts that I mention in the same paragraph. These two facts come from the same source, and are located on the same page of the source. Let's say, for example, that in this paragraph I'm talking about Ferguson and got each fact from the same news article.

  • I assume you want to know how to cite this; your question is incomplete. – Neil Fein Nov 3 '14 at 18:38
  • Sometimes I feel that all these how-to-cite questions belong on academia.SE, because they are not about writing, but about academic standards. Also they are repetitive and can all be answered with a look at the relevant style guide. A question like this shows a clear lack of own research. – user5645 Dec 17 '14 at 8:12
2

It depends on what is in between quote x from Ferguson and y quote from Ferguson. If there is no quotes in between x and y then you can just refer the page number and if there is a quote in between you need to refer to the source again. Also, if there is no sentences between x and y you can just refer to the source after y. However, I personally tend to stay from this idea as it can result in confusion. Now for some examples...

Case 1:

I have sentence that "has a quote in it" (Ferguson,2). Ideally you would have some content here. Then maybe another sentence has a "quote in it" or whatever you are doing (2).

Case 2:

I have sentence that "has a quote in it" (Ferguson,2). Ideally you would "have some content" here (Buff, 32). Then maybe another sentence has a "quote in it" or whatever you are doing (Ferguson,2).

Case 3:

I have sentence that "has a quote in it". Then maybe another sentence has a "quote in it" or whatever you are doing (Ferguson,2).

However, to avoid confusion you should do the same as Case 1 and just refer to the page.

  • Great first post! Wonderful Answer. – hildred Dec 17 '14 at 16:15

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