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The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion. (This is analogous to having a "newbie proxy" character who doesn't know what's going on, and exists to be someone to whom other characters can explain the situation.)

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this all-knowing narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!

In summary, make sure the reasons for the name change are solid and believable; as in any story, make sure your characters are well-drawn; and do your best to anticipate and head off issues the reader will have.

The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion. (This is analogous to having a "newbie proxy" character who doesn't know what's going on, and exists to be someone to whom other characters can explain the situation.)

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this all-knowing narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!

In summary, make sure the reasons for the name change are solid and believable; as in any story, make sure your characters are well-drawn; and do your best to anticipate and head off issues the reader will have.

The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion. (This is analogous to having a "newbie proxy" character who doesn't know what's going on, and exists to be someone to whom other characters can explain the situation.)

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!

In summary, make sure the reasons for the name change are solid and believable; as in any story, make sure your characters are well-drawn; and do your best to anticipate and head off issues the reader will have.

2 added 384 characters in body
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The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion.  (This is analogous to having a "newbie proxy" character who doesn't know what's going on, and exists to be someone to whom other characters can explain the situation.)

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this all-knowing narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!

In summary, make sure the reasons for the name change are solid and believable; as in any story, make sure your characters are well-drawn; and do your best to anticipate and head off issues the reader will have.

The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion.  

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this all-knowing narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!

The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion. (This is analogous to having a "newbie proxy" character who doesn't know what's going on, and exists to be someone to whom other characters can explain the situation.)

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this all-knowing narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!

In summary, make sure the reasons for the name change are solid and believable; as in any story, make sure your characters are well-drawn; and do your best to anticipate and head off issues the reader will have.

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source | link

The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this:

Characterization: If this character is a strong character, and if their thoughts, speech, and actions all ring true to the character, then the reader will be able to identify the character past the name change.

Confusion by proxy: Another tool you can use is that, if the name change is done "publicly" (i.e., the other characters are experiencing it as well), then other characters may be slightly confused as well. You can play this up a little bit, and cast those characters' confusion as stand-ins for the reader's confusion. Of course, this may be tricky since people in the real world can see each other and hear each others' voices. But look for opportunities to portray illustrative confusion.

Transparency: Explain why this is happening, and make sure it's clear why the character is changing their name. If the name change is believable, and if the reader buys into it, they'll make the effort to follow along.

Third-person narrator issues: Of course, you have one more problem to overcome: In third-person, the narrator is usually a general, vague entity telling the story. He stood up, she walked across the room, they both thought about the color yellow for different reasons. If that narrator changes their story (i.e., mentions this character by the old name, then the new name), then this all-knowing narrator will have been lying to the reader. Make sure there's a good reason for this!