4 fixed quote formatting
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There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, an inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch.

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave.

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, an inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, an inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch.

or:

We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave.

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

3 deleted 1 character in body
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There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, andan inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, and inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, an inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

2 typos
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There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, and inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, youyour formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, and inferior, who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, you formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

There is a distinct use of "this one" in English which is a matter of usage rather than grammar. It is used by one person to refer to another person (often, though not always, and inferior), who has done something stupid. Thus:

"We were driving along in the rain and this one decided to hit the sunroof switch."

or:

"We were all in the living room watching the game when this one decided to put the cat in the microwave."

(This is an idiomatic usage, so it will be far more common in some parts of the English speaking world than others.)

Your example does not quite fit this idiomatic usage pattern, but it is close enough to it that someone accustomed to that usage might assume that you intended to use that idiom and got it wrong. (That was the first thing I thought of when I read it.)

In any case, your formulation just is not common or idiomatic usage in English, so the short answer to your question is, no.

What you could do to introduce variety into your example question is something like this:

John saw Mario again after three years, and thought that his friend had lost a lot of weight.

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