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As was already pointed out in a comment, I am pretty sure that works in most genres. Two things I would keep in mind:

  1. Watch genre expectations: e.g. in Romance especially (where a good ending is kind of expected I've heard) or Children's, as well as YA if you overdo it, this might be a problem.

  2. Integrate it into the marketing: it might not be wise to have a cute cover and purely positive teaser text, since in general people like to be surprised by plot twists but not by overall content and tone, at least not too much. Inside the story itself, hinting at the upcoming escalation at various points with foreshadowing may also help. Otherwise, you may lose readers who wouldn't read purely for the happy part but are willing to stick with it for the darker things.

As was already pointed out in a comment, I am pretty sure that works in most genres. Two things I would keep in mind:

  1. Watch genre expectations: e.g. in Romance especially (where a good ending is kind of expected I've heard) or Children's, as well as YA if you overdo it, this might be a problem.

  2. Integrate it into the marketing: it might not be wise to have a cute cover and purely positive teaser text, since in general people like to be surprised by plot twists but not by overall content and tone, at least not too much. Inside the story itself, hinting at the upcoming escalation at various points with foreshadowing may also help. Otherwise, you may lose readers wouldn't read purely for the happy part but are willing to stick with it for the darker things.

As was already pointed out in a comment, I am pretty sure that works in most genres. Two things I would keep in mind:

  1. Watch genre expectations: e.g. in Romance especially (where a good ending is kind of expected I've heard) or Children's, as well as YA if you overdo it, this might be a problem.

  2. Integrate it into the marketing: it might not be wise to have a cute cover and purely positive teaser text, since in general people like to be surprised by plot twists but not by overall content and tone, at least not too much. Inside the story itself, hinting at the upcoming escalation at various points with foreshadowing may also help. Otherwise, you may lose readers who wouldn't read purely for the happy part but are willing to stick with it for the darker things.

1
source | link

As was already pointed out in a comment, I am pretty sure that works in most genres. Two things I would keep in mind:

  1. Watch genre expectations: e.g. in Romance especially (where a good ending is kind of expected I've heard) or Children's, as well as YA if you overdo it, this might be a problem.

  2. Integrate it into the marketing: it might not be wise to have a cute cover and purely positive teaser text, since in general people like to be surprised by plot twists but not by overall content and tone, at least not too much. Inside the story itself, hinting at the upcoming escalation at various points with foreshadowing may also help. Otherwise, you may lose readers wouldn't read purely for the happy part but are willing to stick with it for the darker things.