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Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc. Using the same structure will enhance reader recognition.

Many myths and legends have a religious source. It can be both myths from old "old almost forgotten" religions (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome) or legends from more recent religions (e.g. Christianity, Buddhism), and gods, prophets and heroes from these religions may give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to fill it with archetypal symbols.

I suggest looking for these symbols in psychology (Jungianism), dream analysis, and symbol lexicons.

Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc. Using the same structure will enhance reader recognition.

Many myths and legends have a religious source. It can be both myths from old "old almost forgotten" religions (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome) or legends from more recent religions (e.g. Christianity, Buddhism), and gods, prophets and heroes from these religions may give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to fill it with archetypal symbols.

I suggest looking for these symbols in psychology (Jungianism), dream analysis, and symbol lexicons.

Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc. Using the same structure will enhance reader recognition.

Many myths and legends have a religious source. It can be both myths from "old almost forgotten" religions (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome) or legends from more recent religions (e.g. Christianity, Buddhism), and gods, prophets and heroes from these religions may give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to fill it with archetypal symbols.

I suggest looking for these symbols in psychology (Jungianism), dream analysis, and symbol lexicons.

3 The definition of legends doesn't actually account for an explanation of natural phenomenon... + symbols
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Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc. Using the same structure will enhance reader recognition.

Many myths and legends (most?) have a religious source, so figuring out an. It can be both myths from old "old almost forgotten" religionreligions (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome) or legends from more recent religions (e.g. Christianity, Buddhism), and Godsgods, prophets and Heroesheroes from that religion mightthese religions may give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Legends and mythsMyths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to givefill it that depthwith archetypal symbols.

I suggest looking for these symbols in psychology (Jungianism), dream analysis, and symbol lexicons.

Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc.

Many myths and legends (most?) have a religious source, so figuring out an "old almost forgotten" religion (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome), and Gods and Heroes from that religion might give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Legends and myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to give it that depth.

Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc. Using the same structure will enhance reader recognition.

Many myths and legends have a religious source. It can be both myths from old "old almost forgotten" religions (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome) or legends from more recent religions (e.g. Christianity, Buddhism), and gods, prophets and heroes from these religions may give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to fill it with archetypal symbols.

I suggest looking for these symbols in psychology (Jungianism), dream analysis, and symbol lexicons.

2 deleted 87 characters in body
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I agree with a lot in Amadeus answer. Black and White, Good and Evil... and of courseApart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey."

AnotherJourney", another source of myths, legends, and archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc.

Many myths and legends (most?) have a religious source, so figuring out an "old almost forgotten" religion (thinke.g. ancient Greece/Rome), and Gods and Heroes from that religion might give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Legends and myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so heher mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to give it that depth.

I agree with a lot in Amadeus answer. Black and White, Good and Evil... and of course "The Hero's Journey."

Another source of myths, legends, and archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc.

Many myths and legends (most?) have a religious source, so figuring out an "old almost forgotten" religion (think ancient Greece/Rome), and Gods and Heroes from that religion might give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Legends and myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so he mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to give it that depth.

Apart from Campbell's "The Hero's Journey", another source of archetypal knowledge is folktales. You could take a look at the work of Vladimir Propp and his analysis of Russian folktales.

Both Campbell's and Propp's works describe a structure common to many stories of each category: the repetition of three, leaving the normal world, the appearance of a guide or mentor, being sent on a quest by the king, etc.

Many myths and legends (most?) have a religious source, so figuring out an "old almost forgotten" religion (e.g. ancient Greece/Rome), and Gods and Heroes from that religion might give your legends a backbone.

Folktales usually don't have that kind of source.

Legends and myths are also, sometimes, used to explain natural phenomenon:

Persephone was forced to live in the underworld for half a year so her mother Demeter, the goddess of agriculture, harvest etc, mourned and there was winter, and then when Persephone returned Demeter was happy and there was spring, summer, harvest...

Both myths and folktales belong in the oral tradition, so they usually have more psychological and symbolical depth than they seem at first glance. Many people (and their minds) have bent, twisted and adjusted the story to give it that depth.

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