4 added 99 characters in body
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Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. ''Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts.' I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole. The passage feels amateurish, and fan-fic-like.

But on the other hand, what the answerthat paragraph accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever it's raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever it's raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe.'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts.' I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole. The passage feels amateurish, and fan-fic-like.

But on the other hand, what that paragraph accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever it's raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

3 added 1 character in body
source | link

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever itsit's raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever its raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever it's raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

2 added 1 character in body
source | link

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love BrusselBrussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever its raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussel sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever its raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

Answer: To answer these sorts of prompts, particularly in the case where example answers trigger a negative response in you, I recommend the following. 1. Look for the structure of the 'perfect answer' and apply that structure to your writing. 2. Identify the specifics that you dislike, in this case that make a passage sound like fan fiction.

The example answer:

Every kid in the neighborhood knew the Robinson house and avoided it like a bowl of Brussels sprouts. Mr. Robinson was a notorious crank, the house was always dark and creepy, and his dog was a terror—a mean, fang-toothed creature that looked like she would love to tear you apart.

...has all sorts of issues that make me cringe. I love Brussels sprouts. LOVE them. 'Every kid...' Really? Every last one? Even the weird-o chick that lives three doors down who you only see on Tuesday nights when she's prowling the neighborhood with fake blood on her face? 'dark and creepy' ...cliche. 'mean, fang-toothed creature' ... hyperbole.

But on the other hand, what the answer accomplishes is to take a universal point of reference (the Robinson house) and follow it with specifics to support the thesis (greatest fear). This approach is a trick used in writing, including non-fan-fiction writing. Begin with a relatable event and focus in.

As Chris said, embrace your own voice. But look to these sorts of provided answers to find the structure and commonalities. Read analytically, in addition to for enjoyment and creatively.

For what its worth, my voice would be less flowery than the example (no fang-toothed creatures) and would have no particular absolutes, though there'd be specifics.

Like many of my classmates, my greatest fear is going anywhere near the vending machine on the south side of campus. That's where Mr. Vogel, the Biology instructor, insists on stringing up all the dissected fetal pigs each spring, as a morbid joke about what we could expect on the lab final. It's worse on cloudy days, because the formaldehyde really gets strong when it's damp, and even in the fall you can't help but think about those corpses, little piglets, whenever its raining out. I don't know anyone who goes there alone, especially once April rolls around."

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