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That is a pickle.

The sons of Levi are obeying the words of their prophet, which they believe to be the words of god. They have no choice.

I suggest the kids see sudden activity, men and youths grabbing swords and knives, leaving. Your kids hear the angry words of Moses and stay in the tent with the others, but the quiet bustle of activity makes some just have to watch.

One or two might peek out and see the head of the household strike down someone but it isn’t clear who. Everything would be over quickly, but there would be screams and pleading and then silence. The silence is what is worse, for the reader - especially the older ones - will understand why the screams stopped.

Have the kids frightened by the commotion, not believing it is happening. Perhaps they distance themselves from the tragedy by reminding themselves that these people have been dead for millennia. The silence that follows will be eloquent and no one who took part will want to think about it, certainly not talk about it.

He returned to his family, the silence that had been so roughly disturbed had healed itself. Wiping his blade clean, he looked at his wife, the sorrow in her eyes a match to his own. Such was the price of sacrilege. “It was the will of God. We shall not speak of it.”

Of course, what do I know? I was raised presbyterian n and given a bible for children.

That is a pickle.

The sons of Levi are obeying the words of their prophet, which they believe to be the words of god. They have no choice.

I suggest the kids see sudden activity, men and youths grabbing swords and knives, leaving. Your kids hear the angry words of Moses and stay in the tent with the others, but the quiet bustle of activity makes some just have to watch.

One or two might peek out and see the head of the household strike down someone but it isn’t clear who. Everything would be over quickly, but there would be screams and pleading and then silence. The silence is what is worse, for the reader - especially the older ones - will understand why the screams stopped.

Have the kids frightened by the commotion, not believing it is happening. Perhaps they distance themselves from the tragedy by reminding themselves that these people have been dead for millennia. The silence that follows will be eloquent and no one who took part will want to think about it, certainly not talk about it.

He returned to his family, the silence that had been so roughly disturbed had healed itself. Wiping his blade clean, he looked at his wife, the sorrow in her eyes a match to his own. Such was the price of sacrilege. “It was the will of God. We shall not speak of it.”

Of course, what do I know? I was raised presbyterian n and given bible for children.

That is a pickle.

The sons of Levi are obeying the words of their prophet, which they believe to be the words of god. They have no choice.

I suggest the kids see sudden activity, men and youths grabbing swords and knives, leaving. Your kids hear the angry words of Moses and stay in the tent with the others, but the quiet bustle of activity makes some just have to watch.

One or two might peek out and see the head of the household strike down someone but it isn’t clear who. Everything would be over quickly, but there would be screams and pleading and then silence. The silence is what is worse, for the reader - especially the older ones - will understand why the screams stopped.

Have the kids frightened by the commotion, not believing it is happening. Perhaps they distance themselves from the tragedy by reminding themselves that these people have been dead for millennia. The silence that follows will be eloquent and no one who took part will want to think about it, certainly not talk about it.

He returned to his family, the silence that had been so roughly disturbed had healed itself. Wiping his blade clean, he looked at his wife, the sorrow in her eyes a match to his own. Such was the price of sacrilege. “It was the will of God. We shall not speak of it.”

Of course, what do I know? I was raised presbyterian and given a bible for children.

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source | link

That is a pickle.

The sons of Levi are obeying the words of their prophet, which they believe to be the words of god. They have no choice.

I suggest the kids see sudden activity, men and youths grabbing swords and knives, leaving. Your kids hear the angry words of Moses and stay in the tent with the others, but the quiet bustle of activity makes some just have to watch.

One or two might peek out and see the head of the household strike down someone but it isn’t clear who. Everything would be over quickly, but there would be screams and pleading and then silence. The silence is what is worse, for the reader - especially the older ones - will understand why the screams stopped.

Have the kids frightened by the commotion, not believing it is happening. Perhaps they distance themselves from the tragedy by reminding themselves that these people have been dead for millennia. The silence that follows will be eloquent and no one who took part will want to think about it, certainly not talk about it.

He returned to his family, the silence that had been so roughly disturbed had healed itself. Wiping his blade clean, he looked at his wife, the sorrow in her eyes a match to his own. Such was the price of sacrilege. “It was the will of God. We shall not speak of it.”

Of course, what do I know? I was raised presbyterian n and given bible for children.