2 minor spelling typos and such
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What Chris said, but with the concomitant point that solutions must be merited. They don't have to be probable. Little in most stories is truly probable. Stories basically run on coincidences. Their logic is moral. Misfortune
Misfortune is often merited by a moral flaw, but is can also exist to create some moral dilemma. Good fortune, on the other hand, must always be metited by moral action. If the lion refuses to eat Androcles, it mistmust be because Androcles took a thorn out from its paw earlier.

(There is also a role for apprentapparent good fortune, which need not be merited if it is leads to a new moral dilemma.)

What Chris said, but with the concomitant point that solutions must be merited. They don't have to be probable. Little in most stories is truly probable. Stories basically run on coincidences. Their logic is moral. Misfortune is often merited by a moral flaw, but is can also exist to create some moral dilemma. Good fortune, on the other hand, must always be metited by moral action. If the lion refuses to eat Androcles, it mist be because Androcles took a thorn out its paw earlier.

(There is also a role for apprent good fortune, which need not be merited it is leads to a new moral dilemma.)

What Chris said, but with the concomitant point that solutions must be merited. They don't have to be probable. Little in most stories is truly probable. Stories basically run on coincidences. Their logic is moral.
Misfortune is often merited by a moral flaw, but is can also exist to create some moral dilemma. Good fortune, on the other hand, must always be metited by moral action. If the lion refuses to eat Androcles, it must be because Androcles took a thorn out from its paw earlier.

(There is also a role for apparent good fortune, which need not be merited if it leads to a new moral dilemma.)

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What Chris said, but with the concomitant point that solutions must be merited. They don't have to be probable. Little in most stories is truly probable. Stories basically run on coincidences. Their logic is moral. Misfortune is often merited by a moral flaw, but is can also exist to create some moral dilemma. Good fortune, on the other hand, must always be metited by moral action. If the lion refuses to eat Androcles, it mist be because Androcles took a thorn out its paw earlier.

(There is also a role for apprent good fortune, which need not be merited it is leads to a new moral dilemma.)