2 added 1 character in body
source | link

Whenever I write, I run into the problem where I have to assign human actions to subjects that, when I contemplate about it, cannot realistically perform those actions. A teacher told me years ago that I should not be doing this, and it has stuck with me ever since, but I've never been able to figure out how to do it properly, and I wonder if the teacher was simply wrong. Consider the following examples:

  1. Science helps us understand nature. (can science perform an action like helping?)
  2. Western culture pursues worldwide equality. (can Western culture perform an action like pursuing?)
  3. That company seeks to promote a product. (can that company perform actions such as seeking and promoting?)

I know about other ways of writing the above sentences, but if I always resort to writing sentencesentences like those below, I feel like every sentence will be long and tedious:

  1. People who do science help us understand nature.
  2. The people of Western culture pursue worldwide equality.
  3. The people of that company seek to promote a product.

My question is whether the first three examples are valid, and I would appreciate it if I were to be provided with resources that help me overcome this hurdle in my writing if this style is bad practice (I don't know if there is a term for this problem, so I don't know what to enter into a search engine in order to find resources on this problem).

Whenever I write, I run into the problem where I have to assign human actions to subjects that, when I contemplate about it, cannot realistically perform those actions. A teacher told me years ago that I should not be doing this, and it has stuck with me ever since, but I've never been able to figure out how to do it properly, and I wonder if the teacher was simply wrong. Consider the following examples:

  1. Science helps us understand nature. (can science perform an action like helping?)
  2. Western culture pursues worldwide equality. (can Western culture perform an action like pursuing?)
  3. That company seeks to promote a product. (can that company perform actions such as seeking and promoting?)

I know about other ways of writing the above sentences, but if I always resort to writing sentence like those below, I feel like every sentence will be long and tedious:

  1. People who do science help us understand nature.
  2. The people of Western culture pursue worldwide equality.
  3. The people of that company seek to promote a product.

My question is whether the first three examples are valid, and I would appreciate it if I were to be provided with resources that help me overcome this hurdle in my writing if this style is bad practice (I don't know if there is a term for this problem, so I don't know what to enter into a search engine in order to find resources on this problem).

Whenever I write, I run into the problem where I have to assign human actions to subjects that, when I contemplate about it, cannot realistically perform those actions. A teacher told me years ago that I should not be doing this, and it has stuck with me ever since, but I've never been able to figure out how to do it properly, and I wonder if the teacher was simply wrong. Consider the following examples:

  1. Science helps us understand nature. (can science perform an action like helping?)
  2. Western culture pursues worldwide equality. (can Western culture perform an action like pursuing?)
  3. That company seeks to promote a product. (can that company perform actions such as seeking and promoting?)

I know about other ways of writing the above sentences, but if I always resort to writing sentences like those below, I feel like every sentence will be long and tedious:

  1. People who do science help us understand nature.
  2. The people of Western culture pursue worldwide equality.
  3. The people of that company seek to promote a product.

My question is whether the first three examples are valid, and I would appreciate it if I were to be provided with resources that help me overcome this hurdle in my writing if this style is bad practice (I don't know if there is a term for this problem, so I don't know what to enter into a search engine in order to find resources on this problem).

1
source | link

Can I assign actions to broad concepts?

Whenever I write, I run into the problem where I have to assign human actions to subjects that, when I contemplate about it, cannot realistically perform those actions. A teacher told me years ago that I should not be doing this, and it has stuck with me ever since, but I've never been able to figure out how to do it properly, and I wonder if the teacher was simply wrong. Consider the following examples:

  1. Science helps us understand nature. (can science perform an action like helping?)
  2. Western culture pursues worldwide equality. (can Western culture perform an action like pursuing?)
  3. That company seeks to promote a product. (can that company perform actions such as seeking and promoting?)

I know about other ways of writing the above sentences, but if I always resort to writing sentence like those below, I feel like every sentence will be long and tedious:

  1. People who do science help us understand nature.
  2. The people of Western culture pursue worldwide equality.
  3. The people of that company seek to promote a product.

My question is whether the first three examples are valid, and I would appreciate it if I were to be provided with resources that help me overcome this hurdle in my writing if this style is bad practice (I don't know if there is a term for this problem, so I don't know what to enter into a search engine in order to find resources on this problem).