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Use variations on names from Ancient history/mythology. Greek, or Norse, or Mayan, or whatever, pick your flavour.

This can give you a very wide variety of fictional names that are still similar to each other (for a rich, "realistic" feel).

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

ItThe Old Testament in particular can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Another suggestion along the same lines: use names from Ancient Greek (or Norse, or Mayan, or whatever, pick your flavour) mythology.

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Another suggestion along the same lines: use names from Ancient Greek (or Norse, or Mayan, or whatever, pick your flavour) mythology.

Use variations on names from Ancient history/mythology. Greek, or Norse, or Mayan, or whatever, pick your flavour.

This can give you a very wide variety of fictional names that are still similar to each other (for a rich, "realistic" feel).

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

The Old Testament in particular can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

3 added 137 characters in body
source | link

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Another suggestion along the same lines: use names from Ancient Greek (or Norse, or Mayan, or whatever, pick your flavour) mythology.

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Another suggestion along the same lines: use names from Ancient Greek (or Norse, or Mayan, or whatever, pick your flavour) mythology.

2 added 1 characters in body
source | link

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

Most of my "fantasy world" style character/place names come from my old testament reading.

This is a complete list of Bible place/person names: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_biblical_names

Though often I change them around a bit (try different letters and syllables, to get a different sound).

Examples:
Hale, Marish, Baltasar, Elam, Kir, Addramalech, Sherd, etc

I get some good metaphors too, but I don't have a link to a list of those.

Examples: The Sword Bathed in Heaven, fed their enemies on the bread of affliction and the water of affliction, a shadow from the heat, a refuge from the storm, etc.

It can give a very authentic "ancient civilisation" feel to native English readers, probably because of the influence the Bible has had on English speaking culture (including fantasy novels) over the centuries.

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