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The easiest solutionway to handle this would probably be to have your geek fascinated with our current timebe fascinated with our current time. Consequently, he'll have seen a lot of movies we know today. He might even be familiar with the memes themselves.

However, in that case, I would expect other people to react with confusion to these outdated referencesother people to react with confusion to these outdated references. I mean, yes, Shakespeare is still being read today, but if a Shakespeare nerd were to quote from any given play, it's pretty unlikely that someone not into Shakespeare would recognize the quote. (The most famous one is probably "to be or not to be" and even then few people know it's about contemplating suicide.)

MaybeAlternatively, if your geek showed his favourite movies to his friends and family, they'll recognize the quotes too, and they'd become a sort of inside joke among his circle of friends.

As for how to find out which references might last a century, you could make a list of non-recent geeky references, and ask around how many people know themdo a survey among people of different ages. (Actually, it's quite likely that something like that already exists somewhere.) Then keep the top ones that are best known among people of all ages, and assume that some people in 2100 will still know them. Most of the others will probably have dropped out of common knowledge.

The age part is important. After all, 30 years is not that long. Children today could easilywill have picked up these references from their parents or even grandparents. However, after a 100 years, everyone who's seen these movies when they first came out will be long dead, so you'd have to rely on these classics having been passed on from generation to generation.

Point in caseDisclaimer: I know your 3 top quotes and could even tell you where they came from, even though I haven't actually seen these movies myself. At the same time, "good night, sweet prince" means absolutely nothing to me, but then, I'm not American.

The easiest solution would probably be to have your geek fascinated with our current time. Consequently, he'll have seen a lot of movies we know today. He might even be familiar with the memes themselves.

However, in that case, I would expect other people to react with confusion to these outdated references. I mean, yes, Shakespeare is still read today, but if a Shakespeare nerd were to quote from any given play, it's pretty unlikely that someone not into Shakespeare would recognize the quote. (The most famous one is probably "to be or not to be" and even then few people know it's about contemplating suicide.)

Maybe you could make a list of non-recent geeky references, and ask around how many people know them. Then keep the top ones and assume that some people in 2100 will still know them. Most of the others will probably have dropped out of common knowledge.

After all, 30 years is not that long. Children today could easily have picked up these references from their parents or grandparents.

Point in case: "good night, sweet prince" means absolutely nothing to me, but then, I'm not American.

The easiest way to handle this would be to have your geek be fascinated with our current time. Consequently, he'll have seen a lot of movies we know today. He might even be familiar with the memes themselves.

However, in that case, I would expect other people to react with confusion to these outdated references. I mean, yes, Shakespeare is still being read today, but if a Shakespeare nerd were to quote from any given play, it's pretty unlikely that someone not into Shakespeare would recognize the quote. (The most famous one is probably "to be or not to be" and even then few people know it's about contemplating suicide.)

Alternatively, if your geek showed his favourite movies to his friends and family, they'll recognize the quotes too, and they'd become a sort of inside joke among his circle of friends.

As for how to find out which references might last a century, you could make a list of non-recent geeky references and do a survey among people of different ages. (Actually, it's quite likely that something like that already exists somewhere.) Then keep the ones that are best known among people of all ages, and assume that some people in 2100 will still know them. Most of the others will probably have dropped out of common knowledge.

The age part is important. After all, 30 years is not that long. Children today will have picked up these references from their parents or even grandparents. However, after a 100 years, everyone who's seen these movies when they first came out will be long dead, so you'd have to rely on these classics having been passed on from generation to generation.

Disclaimer: I know your 3 top quotes and could even tell you where they came from, even though I haven't actually seen these movies myself. At the same time, "good night, sweet prince" means absolutely nothing to me.

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The easiest solution would probably be to have your geek fascinated with our current time. Consequently, he'll have seen a lot of movies we know today. He might even be familiar with the memes themselves.

However, in that case, I would expect other people to react with confusion to these outdated references. I mean, yes, Shakespeare is still read today, but if a Shakespeare nerd were to quote from any given play, it's pretty unlikely that someone not into Shakespeare would recognize the quote. (The most famous one is probably "to be or not to be" and even then few people know it's about contemplating suicide.)

Maybe you could make a list of non-recent geeky references, and ask around how many people know them. Then keep the top ones and assume that some people in 2100 will still know them. Most of the others will probably have dropped out of common knowledge.

After all, 30 years is not that long. Children today could easily have picked up these references from their parents or grandparents.

Point in case: "good night, sweet prince" means absolutely nothing to me, but then, I'm not American.