2 added 195 characters in body
source | link

It's possible, and there are precedents. For example :

“If you took a couple of David Bowies and stuck one of the David Bowies on the top of the other David Bowie, then attached another David Bowie to the end of each of the arms of the upper of the first two David Bowies and wrapped the whole business up in a dirty beach robe you would then have something which didn't exactly look like John Watson, but which those who knew him would find hauntingly familiar.” [Douglas Adams]

The thing to keep in mind is whether the person you have in mind is famous enough that everyone will know who and what you mean (a Monroe, possibly a Streep), and that their appearance has been consistent enough over their acting career (so not a Mirren or an Agutter, unless you define it by year or film title). If you're picking a young actor, it's worth considering that their appearance might change after publication of the novel.

[Edit : If you're not seeing an immediate image associated with the names I've mentioned above, this shows how tricky this can be and I'll have tripped over the point I was trying to make.]

Also, does a reference to a particular actor work in the "world" of the novel? As well as the readers needing to know who she is, if the characters and narrator wouldn't be able to relate to the comparison, it could look incongruous.

Comparing looks is one thing, but if you're introducing a representation of an actual person (particularly a spiritual leader), it would be wise to look at how they're portrayed. In addition to libel considerations, the followers of spiritual leaders will have a certain image of them, and will resent any portrayal that they don't consider accurate. It's worth being particularly careful with this one.

It's possible, and there are precedents. For example :

“If you took a couple of David Bowies and stuck one of the David Bowies on the top of the other David Bowie, then attached another David Bowie to the end of each of the arms of the upper of the first two David Bowies and wrapped the whole business up in a dirty beach robe you would then have something which didn't exactly look like John Watson, but which those who knew him would find hauntingly familiar.” [Douglas Adams]

The thing to keep in mind is whether the person you have in mind is famous enough that everyone will know who and what you mean (a Monroe, possibly a Streep), and that their appearance has been consistent enough over their acting career (so not a Mirren or an Agutter, unless you define it by year or film title). If you're picking a young actor, it's worth considering that their appearance might change after publication of the novel.

Also, does a reference to a particular actor work in the "world" of the novel? As well as the readers needing to know who she is, if the characters and narrator wouldn't be able to relate to the comparison, it could look incongruous.

Comparing looks is one thing, but if you're introducing a representation of an actual person (particularly a spiritual leader), it would be wise to look at how they're portrayed. In addition to libel considerations, the followers of spiritual leaders will have a certain image of them, and will resent any portrayal that they don't consider accurate. It's worth being particularly careful with this one.

It's possible, and there are precedents. For example :

“If you took a couple of David Bowies and stuck one of the David Bowies on the top of the other David Bowie, then attached another David Bowie to the end of each of the arms of the upper of the first two David Bowies and wrapped the whole business up in a dirty beach robe you would then have something which didn't exactly look like John Watson, but which those who knew him would find hauntingly familiar.” [Douglas Adams]

The thing to keep in mind is whether the person you have in mind is famous enough that everyone will know who and what you mean (a Monroe, possibly a Streep), and that their appearance has been consistent enough over their acting career (so not a Mirren or an Agutter, unless you define it by year or film title). If you're picking a young actor, it's worth considering that their appearance might change after publication of the novel.

[Edit : If you're not seeing an immediate image associated with the names I've mentioned above, this shows how tricky this can be and I'll have tripped over the point I was trying to make.]

Also, does a reference to a particular actor work in the "world" of the novel? As well as the readers needing to know who she is, if the characters and narrator wouldn't be able to relate to the comparison, it could look incongruous.

Comparing looks is one thing, but if you're introducing a representation of an actual person (particularly a spiritual leader), it would be wise to look at how they're portrayed. In addition to libel considerations, the followers of spiritual leaders will have a certain image of them, and will resent any portrayal that they don't consider accurate. It's worth being particularly careful with this one.

1
source | link

It's possible, and there are precedents. For example :

“If you took a couple of David Bowies and stuck one of the David Bowies on the top of the other David Bowie, then attached another David Bowie to the end of each of the arms of the upper of the first two David Bowies and wrapped the whole business up in a dirty beach robe you would then have something which didn't exactly look like John Watson, but which those who knew him would find hauntingly familiar.” [Douglas Adams]

The thing to keep in mind is whether the person you have in mind is famous enough that everyone will know who and what you mean (a Monroe, possibly a Streep), and that their appearance has been consistent enough over their acting career (so not a Mirren or an Agutter, unless you define it by year or film title). If you're picking a young actor, it's worth considering that their appearance might change after publication of the novel.

Also, does a reference to a particular actor work in the "world" of the novel? As well as the readers needing to know who she is, if the characters and narrator wouldn't be able to relate to the comparison, it could look incongruous.

Comparing looks is one thing, but if you're introducing a representation of an actual person (particularly a spiritual leader), it would be wise to look at how they're portrayed. In addition to libel considerations, the followers of spiritual leaders will have a certain image of them, and will resent any portrayal that they don't consider accurate. It's worth being particularly careful with this one.