5 Cleaning it up a bit
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The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited then, much like first person, your narration will embody your character and project their voice onto the page. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details noticed by a character will denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters standing side-by-side in a room will notice/describe completely different details and they will describe differently. But with omniscient the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page. Your book's narrative style is controlled by what narrative voice you choose because the language an omniscient author chooses won't be the same language a character would use.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns, personality traits and character interests effectively with omniscient using traditional literary tools, but they won't personalize the narrative voice.

Personally, I think Third Person Limited is the intermediary option between 1st person narrationThe character's voice can only be shown through dialogue and omniscientoccasional monologue. It provides more roomThe narration itself can't be used as subtext to explore aallude to the character's personality simplymoods/feelings because you can interject their individual voice onto the pageit isn't through narrationtheir perspective, where omniscient limits character voiceso the author has to dialoguecompensate for this using other tools and rare monologue passagestechniques. Omniscient

But omniscient will give you that uniform style you seem to be looking for, but I think the narrative voice you choose should depend on what the individual story calls for. Some stories are more powerful and more effectively dramatized in a limited (or first) perspective, whereas others require the scope of omniscient narration to provide a panoramic story experience.

The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited then, much like first person, your narration will embody your character and project their voice onto the page. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details noticed by a character will denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters standing side-by-side in a room will notice completely different details and they will describe differently. But with omniscient the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page. Your book's narrative style is controlled by what narrative voice you choose because the language an omniscient author chooses won't be the same language a character would use.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns, personality traits and character interests effectively with omniscient using traditional literary tools, but they won't personalize the narrative voice.

Personally, I think Third Person Limited is the intermediary option between 1st person narration and omniscient. It provides more room to explore a character's personality simply because you can interject their individual voice onto the page through narration, where omniscient limits character voice to dialogue and rare monologue passages. Omniscient will give you that uniform style you seem to be looking for, but I think the narrative voice you choose should depend on what the individual story calls for. Some stories are more powerful and more effectively dramatized in a limited (or first) perspective, whereas others require the scope of omniscient narration to provide a panoramic story experience.

The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited then, much like first person, your narration will embody your character and project their voice onto the page. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details noticed by a character will denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters standing side-by-side in a room will notice/describe completely different details. But with omniscient the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page. Your book's narrative style is controlled by what narrative voice you choose because the language an omniscient author chooses won't be the same language a character would use.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns, personality traits and character interests effectively with omniscient using traditional literary tools, but they won't personalize the narrative voice. The character's voice can only be shown through dialogue and occasional monologue. The narration itself can't be used as subtext to allude to the character's moods/feelings because it isn't through their perspective, so the author has to compensate for this using other tools and techniques.

But omniscient will give you that uniform style you seem to be looking for.

4 Cleaning it up a bit
source | link

The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited narrative voice then, much like first person, your narration will reflectembody your character and project their voice onto the character's voices specificallypage. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details describednoticed by a character will denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters will not notice the same details if they were standing side-by-side in a room will notice completely different details and they will describe differently. But with an omniscient narrative voice, the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page. Your book's narrative style is controlled by what narrative voice you choose because the language an omniscient author chooses won't be the same language a character would use. 

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns (terseness) and characteristics (taciturn, anxious, lethargic)personality traits and character interests effectively with omniscient p.o.v.using traditional literary tools, but your tools are more limited and distanced. Dialogue isthey won't personalize the only real intimate tool you have to show a character's personality aside from impersonal narrative and expository incitesvoice. 

Personally, I think Third Person Limited is the intermediary option between 1st person narration and omniscient. It provides more room to explore a character's personality simply because, like first person, it is more intimately connected to you can interject their individual voice onto the character's perspective and isn't as distancing as an authorial narrator who is reciting a story impartiallypage through narration, butwhere omniscient p.o.vlimits character voice to dialogue and rare monologue passages. is whatOmniscient will give you that uniform narrative style that you'reyou seem to be looking for. Your authorial voice will determine, but I think the story's tone and will highlight your values and preferences as an author. Readers will know hownarrative voice you feel about certain ethical, political and social issues basedchoose should depend on how you present themwhat the individual story calls for. Some stories are more powerful and describe themmore effectively dramatized in your narrativea limited (or first) perspective, which is much easier to conceal if you were to adoptwhereas others require the character's voice asscope of omniscient narration to provide a narrator insteadpanoramic story experience. But everything is relative and has its trade-offs

The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited narrative voice then, much like first person, your narration will reflect the character's voices specifically. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details described by a character denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters will not notice the same details if they were standing side-by-side in a room. But with an omniscient narrative voice, the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns (terseness) and characteristics (taciturn, anxious, lethargic) with omniscient p.o.v., but your tools are more limited and distanced. Dialogue is the only real intimate tool you have to show a character's personality aside from impersonal narrative and expository incites.

Personally, I think Third Person Limited provides more room to explore a character's personality because, like first person, it is more intimately connected to the character's perspective and isn't as distancing as an authorial narrator who is reciting a story impartially, but omniscient p.o.v. is what will give you that uniform narrative style that you're looking for. Your authorial voice will determine the story's tone and will highlight your values and preferences as an author. Readers will know how you feel about certain ethical, political and social issues based on how you present them and describe them in your narrative, which is much easier to conceal if you were to adopt the character's voice as a narrator instead. But everything is relative and has its trade-offs

The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited then, much like first person, your narration will embody your character and project their voice onto the page. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details noticed by a character will denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters standing side-by-side in a room will notice completely different details and they will describe differently. But with omniscient the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page. Your book's narrative style is controlled by what narrative voice you choose because the language an omniscient author chooses won't be the same language a character would use. 

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns, personality traits and character interests effectively with omniscient using traditional literary tools, but they won't personalize the narrative voice. 

Personally, I think Third Person Limited is the intermediary option between 1st person narration and omniscient. It provides more room to explore a character's personality simply because you can interject their individual voice onto the page through narration, where omniscient limits character voice to dialogue and rare monologue passages. Omniscient will give you that uniform style you seem to be looking for, but I think the narrative voice you choose should depend on what the individual story calls for. Some stories are more powerful and more effectively dramatized in a limited (or first) perspective, whereas others require the scope of omniscient narration to provide a panoramic story experience.

3 added 164 characters in body
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ItThe uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited narrative voice then, much like first person, your narration will reflect the character's voices specifically. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details described by a character denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters will not notice the same details if they were standing side-by-side in a room. But with an omniscient narrative voice, the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns (terseness) and characteristics (taciturn, anxious, lethargic) with omniscient p.o.v., but your tools are more limited and distanced. Dialogue is the only real intimate tool you have to show a character's personality aside from impersonal narrative and expository incites.

Personally, I think Third Person Limited provides more room to explore a character's personality because, like first person, it is more intimately connected to the character's perspective and isn't as distancing as an authorial narrator who is reciting a story impartially, but omniscient p.  o.v. is what will give you that uniform narrative style that you're looking for. Your authorial voice will determine the story's tone and will highlight your values and preferences as an author. Readers will know how you feel about certain ethical, political and social issues based on how you present them and describe them in your narrative, which is much easier to conceal if you were to adopt the character's voice as a narrator instead. But everything is relative and has its trade-offs

It depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited narrative voice then, much like first person, your narration will reflect the character's voices specifically. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details described by a character denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters will not notice the same details if they were standing side-by-side in a room. But with an omniscient narrative voice, the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns (terseness) and characteristics (taciturn, anxious, lethargic) with omniscient p.o.v., but your tools are more limited and distanced. Dialogue is the only real intimate tool you have to show a character's personality aside from impersonal narrative and expository incites.

Personally, I think Third Person Limited provides more room to explore a character's personality because, like first person, it is more intimately connected to the character's perspective and isn't as distancing as an authorial narrator who is reciting a story impartially.  

The uniform style depends on the type of narrative voice you choose to use.

An omniscient third person narrative voice is the implied authorial voice that remains constant and unchanging throughout the story. It isn't colored by the character's individuality at all. Terry Pratchett, J.R.R Tolkien, Jk Rowling, HG Wells and Jane Austen are examples of authors who narrated their stories using their individual, authorial voices.

But if you decide to use a Third Person Limited narrative voice then, much like first person, your narration will reflect the character's voices specifically. The reader will be able to recognize which character is narrating the story based on their word choice, sentence structure and syntax. The details described by a character denote who they are, what they value and what they want. Two characters will not notice the same details if they were standing side-by-side in a room. But with an omniscient narrative voice, the details, descriptions, sentence structure, word choice and syntax will remain constant, regardless of which character is emoting on the page.

You can, of course, still show individual speech patterns (terseness) and characteristics (taciturn, anxious, lethargic) with omniscient p.o.v., but your tools are more limited and distanced. Dialogue is the only real intimate tool you have to show a character's personality aside from impersonal narrative and expository incites.

Personally, I think Third Person Limited provides more room to explore a character's personality because, like first person, it is more intimately connected to the character's perspective and isn't as distancing as an authorial narrator who is reciting a story impartially, but omniscient p.o.v. is what will give you that uniform narrative style that you're looking for. Your authorial voice will determine the story's tone and will highlight your values and preferences as an author. Readers will know how you feel about certain ethical, political and social issues based on how you present them and describe them in your narrative, which is much easier to conceal if you were to adopt the character's voice as a narrator instead. But everything is relative and has its trade-offs

2 added 164 characters in body
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