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Such situations in writing could be resolved once you attribute certain qualities specific for your character.

When Akash is introduced in a scene (before meeting Maria), make sure to detail his appearance and behaviour specific to him. Next, when he meets Maria, she notices these peculiarities in him while still addressing him as 'the man'. So the readers know Maria has met Akash in that particular scene, while Mariashe can remain ignorant about his identity in as many scenes you choose. Better yet, introduce him in a particular setting, defining his entire lookslook, and in the next scene he bumps into Maria.

For example, Akash is a handsome young man with specs, keeps his beard trimmed, is not comfortable around strangers, and constantly fidgets with things when nervous. In his introduction scene, he was in his office, dressed in formals, negotiating a deal with his clients. Next, he comes in cafeteria and meets Maria.

Maria saw a handsome man (describe his look briefly). He ran his hands onscratched his beard as he approached her.

"Hi," the man said. "How are you?" He ran his hands on the bridge of his nose.

"I'm good," Maria said.

"Do you know the time?" the man asked nervously looking at his empty wrist.

"It's 3:00PM," Maria said. "What's your name?"

"Akash," the man said.

Remember not to overdo the description or it might reduce the impact of the scene. Just drop subtle hints specific to the character and bring it back when needed.

Such situations in writing could be resolved once you attribute certain qualities specific for your character.

When Akash is introduced in a scene (before meeting Maria), make sure to detail his appearance and behaviour specific to him. Next, when he meets Maria, she notices these peculiarities in him while still addressing him as 'the man'. So the readers know Maria has met Akash in that particular scene, while Maria can remain ignorant about his identity in as many scenes you choose. Better yet, introduce him in a particular setting, defining his entire looks, and in the next scene he bumps into Maria.

For example, Akash is a handsome young man with specs, keeps his beard trimmed, is not comfortable around strangers, and constantly fidgets with things when nervous. In his introduction scene, he was in his office, dressed in formals, negotiating a deal with his clients. Next, he comes in cafeteria and meets Maria.

Maria saw a handsome man (describe his look briefly). He ran his hands on his beard as he approached her.

"Hi," the man said. "How are you?" He ran his hands on the bridge of his nose.

"I'm good," Maria said.

"Do you know the time?" the man asked nervously looking at his empty wrist.

"It's 3:00PM," Maria said. "What's your name?"

"Akash," the man said.

Remember not to overdo the description or it might reduce the impact of the scene. Just drop subtle hints specific to the character and bring it back when needed.

Such situations in writing could be resolved once you attribute certain qualities specific for your character.

When Akash is introduced in a scene (before meeting Maria), make sure to detail his appearance and behaviour specific to him. Next, when he meets Maria, she notices these peculiarities in him while still addressing him as 'the man'. So the readers know Maria has met Akash in that particular scene, while she can remain ignorant about his identity in as many scenes you choose. Better yet, introduce him in a particular setting, defining his entire look, and in the next scene he bumps into Maria.

For example, Akash is a handsome young man with specs, keeps his beard trimmed, is not comfortable around strangers, and constantly fidgets with things when nervous. In his introduction scene, he was in his office, dressed in formals, negotiating a deal with his clients. Next, he comes in cafeteria and meets Maria.

Maria saw a handsome man (describe his look briefly). He scratched his beard as he approached her.

"Hi," the man said. "How are you?" He ran his hands on the bridge of his nose.

"I'm good," Maria said.

"Do you know the time?" the man asked nervously looking at his empty wrist.

"It's 3:00PM," Maria said. "What's your name?"

"Akash," the man said.

Remember not to overdo the description or it might reduce the impact of the scene. Just drop subtle hints specific to the character and bring it back when needed.

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Such situations in writing could be resolved once you attribute certain qualities specific for your character.

When Akash is introduced in a scene (before meeting Maria), make sure to detail his appearance and behaviour specific to him. Next, when he meets Maria, she notices these peculiarities in him while still addressing him as 'the man'. So the readers know Maria has met Akash in that particular scene, while Maria can remain ignorant about his identity in as many scenes you choose. Better yet, introduce him in a particular setting, defining his entire looks, and in the next scene he bumps into Maria.

For example, Akash is a handsome young man with specs, keeps his beard trimmed, is not comfortable around strangers, and constantly fidgets with things when nervous. In his introduction scene, he was in his office, dressed in formals, negotiating a deal with his clients. Next, he comes in cafeteria and meets Maria.

Maria saw a handsome man (describe his look briefly). He ran his hands on his beard as he approached her.

"Hi," the man said. "How are you?" He ran his hands on the bridge of his nose.

"I'm good," Maria said.

"Do you know the time?" the man asked nervously looking at his empty wrist.

"It's 3:00PM," Maria said. "What's your name?"

"Akash," the man said.

Remember not to overdo the description or it might reduce the impact of the scene. Just drop subtle hints specific to the character and bring it back when needed.