3 added 63 characters in body
source | link

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it (including Mohammed) won't succeed on any level, but you stated this wasn't your intent. I don't remember when, where, or the title, but in high school, I read an amazing fictional story between Joan of Arc and Mary (Jesus's mom) about the role of women in society written during the time of the Equal Rights Amendment in America.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it won't succeed on any level. I don't remember when, where, or the title, but in high school I read an amazing fictional story between Joan of Arc and Mary (Jesus's mom) about the role of women in society written during the time of the Equal Rights Amendment.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it (including Mohammed) won't succeed on any level, but you stated this wasn't your intent. I don't remember when, where, or the title, but in high school, I read an amazing story between Joan of Arc and Mary (Jesus's mom) about the role of women in society written during the time of the Equal Rights Amendment in America.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.

2 added 230 characters in body
source | link

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it won't succeed on any level. I don't remember when, where, or the title, but in high school I read an amazing fictional story between Joan of Arc and Mary (Jesus's mom) about the role of women in society written during the time of the Equal Rights Amendment.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it won't succeed on any level.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it won't succeed on any level. I don't remember when, where, or the title, but in high school I read an amazing fictional story between Joan of Arc and Mary (Jesus's mom) about the role of women in society written during the time of the Equal Rights Amendment.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.

1
source | link

I have a couple of ideas.

  1. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main characters back and forth 250 years.

  2. I actually like the idea of meeting Mohammed as long as this is for yourself. Talking with God, or his prophets or interceders, can be a dynamic philosophical discussion. For commercial purposes, it won't succeed on any level.

  3. Surrealism. As previously mentioned, this is a great way to blend the line between fantasy and reality. A slightly more approachable term to Google search would be psychedelia. This term derives from the use of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s and beyond. There will be a large number of movies and books to help guide you in this genre. Confusion is the key element.

  4. Perceptual Disturbances. It won't take long, but you may benefit from looking at the definition of psychosis in medical terminology such as DSM-V. Understanding what really happens to the brain when you're talking about bordering on reality will make for a better story.