4 deleted 1 character in body
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I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins"Baggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it is clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it is clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Baggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it is clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

3 added 3 characters in body
source | link

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it is clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it is clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

2 added 1 character in body
source | link

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptiondescriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general description, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

I (sometimes/often) do the total opposite; I barely describe some characters and leave it almost entirely up to the reader to decide what they look like.

I may give general descriptions, such as "male", "forties", etc., but that's about it.

Why? Well, because I am writing a story and the story itself is what matters most - not what colour the protagonist's moustache is (unless, of course, the story is specifically about the colour of the protagonist's facial hair).

However, I should also point out that some characters' descriptions being highly-detailed is often vital. Take J.R.R. Tolkein's "The Hobbit" - there are a great many wonderful creatures featuring in that classic story, some little, some large, and some stunning plains upon which the action takes place, and it makes sense to describe each thoroughly due to the fantastical nature of the tale that he tells - Tolkein clearly wanted to paint a very specific picture in the reader's mind (although, I'm sure, we all now picture Martin Freeman whenever we hear the name "Bilbo Bagggins" but that's the film industry for you!).

As mentioned by the user what, I too am unsure of what your "question" might be; it may well be that you yourself are unsure, but I do not condemn you (for lack of a better phrase) for your post at all as it clear that you have some doubts and are most probably looking to ask something along the lines of "What relevance do highly-detailed character and/or scene descriptions have in a story?"

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